top of page

BackTable / ENT / Podcast / Episode #94

What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process?

with Dr. Sarah Bowe

In this episode of BackTable ENT, Dr. Gopi Shah, Dr. Ashley Agan, and Dr. Sarah Bowe discuss new developments in the ENT residency match process as well as advice for future applicants.

Be part of the conversation. Put your sponsored messaging on this episode. Learn how.

What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process? with Dr. Sarah Bowe on the BackTable ENT Podcast)
Ep 94 What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process? with Dr. Sarah Bowe
00:00 / 01:04

BackTable, LLC (Producer). (2023, March 7). Ep. 94 – What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process? [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.backtable.com

Free CME

Reflect on how this Podcast applies to your day-to-day and earn free AMA PRA Category 1 CMEs. Follow the button below to claim your credits on CMEfy.

BackTable CMEfy button

Stay Up To Date

Follow:

Subscribe:

Sign Up:

Podcast Contributors

Dr. Sarah Bowe discusses What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process? on the BackTable 94 Podcast

Dr. Sarah Bowe

Dr. Sarah Bowe is the director of pediatric otolaryngology of the Defense Health Agency and an associate professor with USU in San Antonio, Texas.

Dr. Ashley Agan discusses What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process? on the BackTable 94 Podcast

Dr. Ashley Agan

Dr. Ashley Agan is a practicing ENT and assistant professor at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX.

Dr. Gopi Shah discusses What’s New in the ENT Residency Match Process? on the BackTable 94 Podcast

Dr. Gopi Shah

Dr. Gopi Shah is a practicing ENT at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX.

Show Notes

First, the doctors explain new policies in the match process. In 2015, the merging of osteopathic and allopathic accreditation systems began, which led to a single accreditation system combining osteopathic and allopathic accreditation in 2021. In 2022, the USMLE Step 1 exam switched to a pass/fail system from a numerical scoring system. The doctors note that although Step 1 scores used to be an application filter, research has shown that there is no correlation between scores and success during residency. Dr. Bowe notes that many programs deemed it necessary to filter using Step 1 scores because residency applications take a long time to read through. Additionally, standardized test scores do correlate well with board passage rates. Dr. Agan mentions that programs may use Step 2 scores as a replacement for Step 1 scores, leading some applicants to feel conflicted about having a Step 2 score before submitting their ERAS application. However, there have not been set Step 2 metrics for filtering applicants yet.

Next, the doctors discuss reading through applications from a program perspective. Dr. Bowe explains that bigger programs have bigger faculty, which means more application readers are available. Some programs will set unique filters to screen for IMG applicants or career goals. Then, she discusses the use of the new signaling program, an initiative that distributes applicants a certain number of tokens to indicate their programs of interest. Signaling can equalize the playing field for applicants who do not have a home ENT program or do not have the resources to do as many sub-internship and away rotations as they would like. Additionally, signaling may serve as a surrogate application cap for programs.

Finally, the doctors explain other parts of the residency application, such as letters of recommendation, research, and gap years. Because almost every ENT applicant is listed as “above average” on the standardized application, Dr. Bowe emphasizes the importance of the narrative sections of letters. Additionally, many programs allow additional space on the application to let students explain more about their background and hardships. Dr. Bowe concedes that research is important on an application, but it depends on the resources of each applicant’s home institutions as well as their non-academic priorities, like part-time jobs. Additionally, in her opinion, a gap year to do research should only be taken if the applicant is aspiring to be a clinician scientist. Dr. Shah emphasizes the importance of taking a gap year because of personal interest, not for a stronger application. Finally, Dr. Agan speaks about differences between in-person and virtual interviews. There are cons of virtual interviews, such as interview hoarding and lack of interpersonal and environmental connection, but benefits include lowering expenses and environmental impact.

Resources

Disclaimer: The Materials available on BackTable.com are for informational and educational purposes only and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosing and treating patients. The opinions expressed by participants of the BackTable Podcast belong solely to the participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views of BackTable.

backtable-earn-free-cme.jpg
backtable-plus-vi-cta.jpg
Become a BackTable Sponsor

Up Next

In-Office Management of Salivary Stones with Dr. Ashley Agan on the BackTable ENT Podcast)
The Ins and Outs of Ear Tubes with Dr. Ashley Agan and Dr. Gopi Shah on the BackTable ENT Podcast)
BackTable ENT First Year Podcast Anniversary! with Dr. Gopi Shah and Dr. Ashley Agan on the BackTable ENT Podcast)
You Can't Pour From An Empty Cup: Wellness in ENT with Dr. Ashley Agan on the BackTable ENT Podcast)
Balloon Sinuplasty: Evolution, Efficacy & Expert Insights with Dr. Ayesha Khalid on the BackTable ENT Podcast)

Articles

Topics

Get in touch!

We want to hear from you. Let us know if you’re interested in partnering with BackTable as a Podcast guest, a sponsor, or as a member of the BackTable Team.

Select which show(s) you would like to subscribe to:

Thanks! Message sent.

bottom of page