BackTable / Urology / Podcast / Episode #20

Advanced Treatments for Overactive Bladder (OAB)

with Dr. Daniel Hoffman

Dr. Daniel Hoffman, a urogynecologist specializing in voiding dysfunction, discuss the use of Botox, sacral neuromodulation, and bulking agents in treating overactive bladders. Listen to hear more about patient selection criteria for each treatment, botox and neuromodulation procedure techniques, and treatment side effects and complications.

Advanced Treatments for Overactive Bladder (OAB) with Dr. Daniel Hoffman on the BackTable Urology Podcast)
Ep 20 Advanced Treatments for Overactive Bladder (OAB) with Dr. Daniel Hoffman
00:00 / 01:04

BackTable, LLC (Producer). (2021, October 27). Ep. 20 – Advanced Treatments for Overactive Bladder (OAB) [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.backtable.com

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Podcast Contributors

Dr. Daniel Hoffman discusses Advanced Treatments for Overactive Bladder (OAB) on the BackTable 20 Podcast

Dr. Daniel Hoffman

Dr. Daniel Hoffman is a practicing urologist with AdventHealth in Orlando, Florida.

Dr. Jose Silva discusses Advanced Treatments for Overactive Bladder (OAB) on the BackTable 20 Podcast

Dr. Jose Silva

Dr. Jose Silva is a board certified urologist practicing in Central Florida.

Show Notes

This week on the BackTable Urology Podcast, Dr. Jose Silva and Dr. Daniel Hoffman, a urologist specializing in voiding dysfunction, discuss the use of Botox, sacral neuromodulation, and bulking agents in treating overactive bladders.

First, Dr. Hoffman explains his procedure for Botox, which he suggests as a treatment option for patients with neurogenic bladders. He uses Urojet as anesthesia and injects the Botox in 0.5 cc injections following a grid template. Additionally, he saves 1 cc for the trigone of the bladder. He uses 200 units of Botox in patients with neurogenic bladders and 100 units in those with urge incontinence. Additional considerations should be made for patients with additional comorbidities, such as benign prostate hyperplasia and cystitis. For cystitis patients, increased caution around vascularized areas should be exercised. Additionally, Dr. Hoffman recommends assessing the degree of obstruction in BPH patients before treating their incontinence with Botox.

Next, Dr. Hoffman discusses his procedure for sacral neuromodulation, a procedure that he recommends for younger patients with urinary retention. Although he notes that rechargeable and battery-operated devices have equivalent functions, a patient’s ability to use and maintain the device and MRI-compatibility should be considered. He recommends allowing the patient to undergo a percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) before inserting a permanent device. After permanent device insertion, some patients may experience chronic pain down the leg. Dr. Hoffman recommends reprogramming the device before performing a lead revision. If a lead is fractured and lost during surgery, he advises urologists against going after the fractured lead—neurosurgery should be consulted instead. Finally, he notes that fecal incontinence may also be mitigated through sacral neuromodulation.

Lastly, Dr. Hoffman notes that bulking agents as a potential therapy for women with stress incontinence because they have little to no side effects compared to the pelvic sling. Because he has noticed that coaptite does not have the same longevity as Botox, he considers Bulkamid as a better choice. Like Botox, bulking agents can be quickly injected in the office and result in minimal patient down time.

Transcript Preview

[Dr. Daniel Hoffman]
I firmly believe in shared decision-making so I, I put it up to the patient, you know, what do you want, right. Do you want the new MRI compatible device? Are you happy with your current therapy? And do you just want your battery swapped out? So I, I never pushed therapy. I think that that's a recipe for disaster. So whatever the patient wants. If now what's my, my threshold, I typically tell patients if let's say you're going in for a revision or a, some sort of issue. If anything's older than 18 months, we might as well just do a full swap out, you know, once you start to hit that two year, mark might as well just take everything out and swap it out

Disclaimer: The Materials available on BackTable.com are for informational and educational purposes only and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosing and treating patients. The opinions expressed by participants of the BackTable Podcast belong solely to the participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views of BackTable.

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Articles

A backtable set up for sacral neurostimulation procedure.

Electric Stimulation for Overactive Bladder: Patient Evaluation, Device Selection & Complications

A vial of botox to be used for overactive bladder treatment.

Botox Injections for Overactive Bladder

Topics

Botox for Incontinence Procedure Prep
Overactive Bladder Condition Overview
Sacral Neuromodulation Procedure Prep
Urinary Incontinence Condition Overview

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