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BackTable / VI / Podcast / Episode #291

Percutaneous Creation of a Distal Deep Venous Arterialization (dDVA)

with Dr. August Ysa

In this episode, host Dr. Sabeen Dhand interviews Dr. August Ysa, vascular surgeon in Spain, about distal deep venous arterialization, including indications, patient selection, and how to perform his gunsight technique.

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Percutaneous Creation of a Distal Deep Venous Arterialization (dDVA) with Dr. August Ysa on the BackTable VI Podcast)
Ep 291 Percutaneous Creation of a Distal Deep Venous Arterialization (dDVA) with Dr. August Ysa
00:00 / 01:04

BackTable, LLC (Producer). (2023, February 13). Ep. 291 – Percutaneous Creation of a Distal Deep Venous Arterialization (dDVA) [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from https://www.backtable.com

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Podcast Contributors

Dr. August Ysa discusses Percutaneous Creation of a Distal Deep Venous Arterialization (dDVA) on the BackTable 291 Podcast

Dr. August Ysa

Dr. August Ysa is a vascular surgeon with Hospital de Cruces in Barakaldo, Spain.

Dr. Sabeen Dhand discusses Percutaneous Creation of a Distal Deep Venous Arterialization (dDVA) on the BackTable 291 Podcast

Dr. Sabeen Dhand

Dr. Sabeen Dhand is a practicing interventional radiologist with PIH Health in Los Angeles.

Synopsis

We begin by discussing his training and background. Initially trained in Barcelona before moving to Bilbao as a young vascular surgeon. He came to the US briefly to train at Montefiore and Houston Methodist. When attending the LINNC in Europe one year he saw a live endovascular case, which is when he decided to devote his career to peripheral arterial disease (PAD), specifically below the knee (BTK) and below the ankle (BTA) interventions. He currently works with Dr. Marta Lobato, and they have done around 25 combined deep venous arterializations (DVAs) in their practice. They love this technique because it gives someone previously faced with amputation a new chance. It is a technique to reroute blood flow to get oxygen to a wound and promote wound healing. There are two types of DVA: proximal DVA, which is done closer to the origin of the posterior tibial artery (PTA), and distal DVA, which is at the level of the ankle, and usually also involves the PTA. Thus far, it is unknown which technique is better in terms of limb salvage, and data shows both techniques yield 60-70% limb salvage rates. One advantage to distal DVA is lower rates of post-DVA storm, a type of ischemic steal syndrome. Availability of devices and lower cost also make distal DVA more appealing. DVA is never the first option, traditional recanalization techniques are always explored first.

Wounds that are not candidates for DVA are large infected wounds or areas of necrotic tissue. This is because it takes 6-8 weeks to establish the newly created connection, and if the wound is already past the point of healing, DVA will not help. Other reasons DVA can fail is due to choosing the wrong candidates. Mean wound healing time after DVA is 4-7 months, so patients need to be able to commit to close follow up and wound care, and they must have the social support to be compliant with frequent clinic visits.

Finally, Dr. Ysa explains his venous arterialization simplification technique (VAST). Before the procedure, he always does a venous ultrasound to rule out prior DVT and evaluate the status of the main veins of the foot. He uses two snares via the gunsight approach, which most IRs are familiar with from TIPS procedures. It involves overlapping two snares and then performing a through and through puncture from the PTA to the posterior tibial vein (PTV). The PTA is generally used over the anterior tibial or the peroneal artery due to its robust connections with the lateral plantar and the plantar arch. He then performs balloon angioplasty (BA) on the PTV. He initially uses the PTA for sizing, but generally goes bigger, between 4-5mm. For valves, he usually does regular BA but will sometimes use a cutting balloon. Two weeks post-DVA he gets an ultrasound, and at one month he gets an angiogram to evaluate the new tract. He has his patients take a single antiplatelet and a blood thinner after the procedure. He considers DVA to have failed if there is progression of wound necrosis.

Resources

Dr. Ysa LinkedIn:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/august-ysa-56a99a174/

YouTube DVA Webinar with Dr. Ysa and Dra. Lobato:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDW5Rg5g49I

Ep. 93 - DVA for CLI with Dr. Fadi Saab:
https://www.backtable.com/shows/vi/podcasts/93/deep-venous-arterialization-for-cli

Live Interventional Neuroradiology, Neurology and Neurosurgery Course (LINNC):
https://www.linnc.com

Patterns of Failure in DVA Paper:
https://www.clijournal.com/article/patterns-failure-deep-venous-arterialization-and-implications-management

Disclaimer: The Materials available on BackTable.com are for informational and educational purposes only and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosing and treating patients. The opinions expressed by participants of the BackTable Podcast belong solely to the participants, and do not necessarily reflect the views of BackTable.

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